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Guidelines for designing teaching and learning for a digital age

Guidelines for designing teaching and learning for a digital age
Author:
Series: Contact Nord Research Associate
Genre: Teaching
Tag: Recommended Books
Publisher: Contact Nord Research Associate
Publication Year: 2016
ISBN: 9780995269200

Teaching in higher education in 2015, and beyond, requires a new approach because of changes in the economy and changes in technology. Faculty and instructors are continually facing questions such as how do I effectively teach an increasingly diverse student population, how do I engage and support my students as class sizes increase, how do I use multi-media and other resources to build a high quality course, and a host of other questions.

About the Book

Teaching in higher education in 2015, and beyond, requires a new approach because of changes in the economy and changes in technology.  Faculty and instructors are continually facing questions such as how do I effectively teach an increasingly diverse student population, how do I engage and support my students as class sizes increase, how do I use multi-media and other resources to build a high quality course, and a host of other questions. Drawing on his 40+ years of experience in higher education in Canada and around the world, Contact North | Contact Nord Research Associate Dr. Tony Bates has authored a comprehensive, easy-to-read guide that answers these questions and many, many more all in a single location. Through 12 informative chapters, Teaching in a Digital Age: Guidelines for Teaching and Learning answers your questions and provides helpful guidance and suggestions on a host of topics including:

  • How do I decide whether my courses should be campus-based, blended or fully online?
  • What strategies work best when teaching in a technology-rich environment? What methods of teaching are most effective for blended and online classes?
  • How do I make choices among all the available media, whether text, audio, video, computer, or social media, in order to benefit my students and my subject?
  • How do I maintain quality of teaching, learning, and resources in a rapidly changing learning environment?
  • What are the real possibilities for teaching and learning using MOOCs, OERS, open textbooks?

While understanding and respecting the individual nature of teaching, Tony talks theory, options, best practices, point-by-point strategies – offering clear, practical, and actionable advice and guidance based on research and extensive professional experience in 30 countries.

Table of Contents
Scenario A: A university professor addresses change
About the book – and how to use it
About the author
Other books by the author
Chapter 1: Fundamental Change in Education
1.1 Structural changes in the economy: the growth of a knowledge society
1.2 The skills needed in a digital age
1.3 Change and continuity
1.4 Should education be tied directly to the labour market?
1.5 The impact of expansion on teaching methods
1.6 Changing students, changing markets for higher education
1.7 From the periphery to the center: how technology is changing the way we teach
1.8 Navigating new developments in technology and online learning
Chapter 2: The nature of knowledge and the implications for teaching
Scenario C: A pre-dinner party discussion
2.1 Art, theory, research, and best practices in teaching
2.2 Epistemology and theories of learning
2.3 Objectivism and behaviourism
2.4 Cognitivism
2.5 Constructivism
2.6 Connectivism
2.7 Is the nature of knowledge changing?
2.8 Summary
Chapter 3: Methods of teaching: campus-focused (link is external)
Scenario D: A stats lecturer fights the system (link is external)
3.1 Five perspectives on teaching (link is external)
3.2 The origins of the classroom design model (link is external)
3.3 Transmissive lectures: learning by listening (link is external)
3.4 Interactive lectures, seminars, and tutorials: learning by talking (link is external)
3.5 Apprenticeship: learning by doing (1) (link is external)
3.6 Experiential learning: learning by doing (2) (link is external)
3.7 The nurturing and social reform models of teaching: learning by feeling (link is external)
3.8 Main conclusions (link is external)
Chapter 4: Methods of teaching with an online focus (link is external)
Scenario E: Developing historical thinking (link is external)
4.1 Online learning and teaching methods (link is external)
4.2 Old wine in new bottles: classroom-type online learning (link is external)
4.3 The ADDIE model (link is external)
4.4 Online collaborative learning (link is external)
4.5 Competency-based learning (link is external)
4.6 Communities of practice (link is external)
Scenario F: ETEC 522: Ventures in e-Learning (link is external)
4.7 ‘Agile’ Design: flexible designs for learning (link is external)
4.8 Making decisions about design models (link is external)
Scenario G: How to cope with being old (link is external)
Chapter 5: MOOCs (link is external)
5.1 Brief history (link is external)
5.2 What is a MOOC? (link is external)
5.3 Variations in MOOC designs (link is external)
5.4 Strengths and weaknesses of MOOCs (link is external)
5.5 Political, social and economic drivers of MOOCs (link is external)
5.6 Why MOOCs are only part of the answer (link is external)
Chapter 6: Understanding technology in education (link is external)
6.1 Choosing technologies for teaching and learning: the challenge (link is external)
6.2 A short history of educational technology (link is external)
6.3 Media or technology? (link is external)
6.4 Broadcast vs communicative media (link is external)
6.5 The time and space dimensions of media (link is external)
6.6 Media richness (link is external)
6.7 Understanding the foundations of educational media (link is external)
Chapter 7: Pedagogical differences between media (link is external)
7.1 Thinking about the pedagogical differences of media (link is external)
7.2 Text (link is external)
7.3 Audio (link is external)
7.4 Video (link is external)
7.5 Computing (link is external)
7.6 Social media (link is external)
7.7 A framework for analysing the pedagogical characteristics of educational media (link is external)
Chapter 8: Choosing and using media in education: the SECTIONS model (link is external)
8.1 Models for media selection (link is external)
8.2 Students (link is external)
8.3 Ease of Use (link is external)
8.4 Cost (link is external)
8.5 Teaching and media selection (link is external)
8.6 Interaction (link is external)
8.7 Organisational issues (link is external)
8.8 Networking (link is external)
8.9 Security and privacy (link is external)
8.10 Deciding (link is external)
Chapter 9: Modes of delivery
9.1 The continuum of technology-based learning
9.2 Comparing delivery methods
9.3 Which mode? Student needs
9.4 Choosing between face-to-face and online teaching on campus
9.5 The future of the campus
Chapter 10: Trends in open education
Scenario H: Watershed management
10.1 Open learning
10.2 Open educational resources (OER)
10.3 Open textbooks, open research and open data
10.4 The implications of ‘open’ for course and program design: towards a paradigm shift?
Chapter 11: Ensuring quality teaching in a digital age
11.1 What do we mean by quality when teaching in a digital age?
11.2 Nine steps to quality teaching in a digital age
11.3 Step One: Decide how you want to teach
11.4 Step two: what kind of course or program?
11.5 Step three: work in a team
11.6 Step four: build on existing resources
11.7 Step five: master the technology
11.8 Step six: set appropriate learning goals
11.9 Step seven: design course structure and learning activities
11.10 Step eight: communicate, communicate, communicate
11.11 Step nine: evaluate and innovate
11.12 Building a strong foundation of course design
Chapter 12: Supporting teachers and instructors in a digital age
12.1 Are you a super-hero?
12.2 The development and training of teachers and instructors in a digital age
12.3 Learning technology support
12.4 Conditions of employment
12.5 Team teaching
12.6 An institutional strategy for teaching in a digital age
12.7 Building the future
Scenario J: Stopping the flu
Appendix 1: Building an effective learning environment
A.1 Integrating design principles within a rich learning environment
A.2 What is a learning environment?
A.3 Learner characteristics
A.4 Managing content
A.5 Developing skills
A.6 Learner support
A.7 Resources
A.8 Assessment of learning
A.9 Building the foundation of good design
Feedback on Activities
Activity 1.8 Main conclusions from Chapter 1
Activity 6.1 How many technologies can you see in Figure 6.1?
Activity 6.4 Broadcast or communicative
Bibliography
Appendix 2: Questions to guide media selection and use
Appendix 3 Online learning quality standards, organisations and research